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In April 2018, the Georgia Court of Appeals ordered a new trial in a medical malpractice lawsuit, Evans v. Rockdale Hospital, LLC, after the jury in the original trial determined a defendant was partially at fault for medical malpractice, yet awarded zero damages for the victim’s pain and suffering. The Court of Appeals found this award “clearly inadequate” under the circumstances, especially since the same jury awarded over $1 million in damages for medical expenses. The Supreme Court of Georgia recently weighed on this same case and determined the Court of Appeals overstepped its authority in ordering a new trial.

Rockdale Hospital, LLC. v. Evans

To briefly review the facts of this case, a 60-year-old woman went to the emergency room of the defendant’s hospital, complaining of a severe headache, high blood pressure, nausea, and vomiting. The hospital staff discharged the woman without identifying any specific cause of her symptoms. Later, doctors at another hospital determined the woman had “suffered several strokes as a result of a ruptured brain aneurysm.” Even following multiple surgeries, the woman remains “permanently and totally disabled.”

On November 19, 2016, a dock attached to a ferry terminal in Savannah collapsed, sending more than 60 people into the water, according to news reports at the time. A number of these people sustained serious injuries, and a Savannah firefighter died after suffering a dissecting aneurysm while participating in rescue activities.

Chatham Area Transit v. Brantley

As you might expect, there was a substantial legal fallout to the deck collapse. Several victims filed personal injury lawsuits against both the City of Savannah and Chatham Area Transit (CAT), which owned the dock. In early 2018, the City moved to dismiss the lawsuits, arguing it was protected by both sovereign immunity and Georgia’s Recreational Property Act (RPA). CAT subsequently argued it was also protected from suit under the RPA.

In most cases, damages arising from a car accident are covered by the negligent driver’s auto insurance policy. But what if the accident occurred while the car was still in the owner’s driveway? Would homeowner’s insurance actually cover such damages?

Wilkinson v. Georgia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company

The Georgia Court of Appeals recently addressed these questions in Wilkinson v. Georgia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company. This case began when a man named Buchanan purchased a used Ford F350 truck. One of Buchanan’s co-workers, a man named Wilkinson, asked to take a look at the truck. Wilkinson and his wife subsequently went to Buchanan’s house.

Following a serious auto accident, many victims are surprised to learn their medical providers may place a lien against any potential personal injury lawsuit they might file in connection with their injuries. Such “hospital liens” are permitted under Georgia law. There are limits to how far hospitals can go with such liens, as illustrated by a recent decision from the Georgia Court of Appeals.

Clouthier v. Medical Center of Georgia, Inc.

In Clouthier v. Medical Center of Georgia, Inc., the plaintiff sued the hospital that treated him following an accident for fraud and negligent misrepresentation. According to the lawsuit, the plaintiff was “injured in a tractor-trailer collision in August 2016.” He was taken by ambulance from the accident scene to the defendant’s hospital.

When you file a personal injury lawsuit against a negligent driving following an auto accident, in most cases this means you are really seeking compensation from the driver’s insurance company. Unfortunately, insurance companies are quite adept at asserting their own legal rights. This includes taking legal action to void a policy if they believe the policy holder–i.e., the negligent driver–did not strict comply with its terms.

American Family Insurance Company v. Almassud

A recent case before a federal judge in Atlanta, American Family Insurance Company v. Almassud, offers a cautionary example. This case involves a 2012 accident in Cumming, Georgia. The defendant was driving his Jeep. According to court records, the Jeep “veered into oncoming traffic and struck a vehicle driven” driven by a woman who sustained serious injuries.

When it comes to personal injury lawsuits, many plaintiffs do not only need to contend with the negligent defendant. They also need to deal with the negligent defendant’s insurance company. Even where the insurer has a contractual duty to indemnify and defend a policyholder, you can rest assured that the company will make every legal effort to avoid providing coverage.

ACCC Insurance Company v. Walker

Take this ongoing lawsuit, ACCC Insurance Company of Georgia v. Walker. This case involves a 2015 auto accident. The defendant was one of the parties involved in the accident. He subsequently filed a personal injury lawsuit against two men, who were insured by the plaintiff, ACCC Insurance.

Pressure cookers were first developed in the 17th century. They create an airtight environment where steam pressure raises the boiling point of water, allowing food to cook much faster than normal. Of course, the buildup of pressure can lead to an explosion if the cooker itself is somehow defective.

Williams v. Tristar Products, Inc.

In an ongoing federal lawsuit, Williams v. Tristar Products, Inc., a Georgia woman alleges that a defective pressure cooker exploded in her home, causing her severe second-degree burns. At the time of the accident, the plaintiff was using a PC-WAL1/TRI-6 pressure cooker, which had been a Christmas gift from her mother. The plaintiff said she had used the pressure cooker on three previous occasions without incident, and that she always followed the manufacturer’s directions.

All Georgia business owners need to take reasonable steps in keeping their premises safe for customers. The key word here is “reasonable.” The law does not require businesses to guarantee safety against all possible or conceivable threats to a customer’s well-being.

Hill v. MM Gas & Food Mart, Inc.

A recent decision from the Georgia Court of Appeals, Hill v. MM Gas & Food Mart, Inc., helps to illustrate this principle. This case involves an October 2013 incident at a Macon convenience store owned by the defendant. The plaintiff and a friend entered the store to purchase lottery tickets. While waiting at the counter, the plaintiff “heard gunshots and the sound of breaking glass.” He then “felt a burning sensation on his head” and fell to the floor.

When a car accident occurs, there may be more than one party who is liable for the victim’s injuries. For example, if the negligent driver was acting on behalf of an employer, the latter can be sued under a number of legal theories. Depending on the specific facts of the case–as well as the defendant employer’s response to the lawsuit–some of these theories may be unavailable to the victim.

Terry v. Old Hat Chimney, LLC

Take this recent decision from the Georgia Court of Appeals, Terry v. Old Hat Chimney, LLC. This case began with a rear-end auto accident that took place in July 2016. The plaintiff claims the other driver, one of the defendants, was liable for his injuries arising from said accident.

Personal injury lawsuits against the State of Georgia or any state agency must strictly comply with the terms of the Georgia Tort Claims Act (GTCA). The GTCA is a state law that waives Georgia’s normal “sovereign immunity” from lawsuits. Before anyone can file a claim under the GTCA, for instance, the claimant must provide advance notice to the state. This notice must be delivered within one year of the claimant’s injury and needs to include a number of specific items, such as the place where the injury occurred, the “nature of the loss suffered,” and the amount claimed for said injury or loss.

The reasoning behind the notice requirement is to give the state an opportunity to conduct its own investigation into the claimant’s allegations and, where possible, the ability to settle the claim without the need for litigation. This is why it is critical for claimants to provide as much information as required by law.

Bailey v. Georgia World Congress Center