Articles Tagged with personal injury attorney

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Many nursing care facilities in Georgia pressure their residents to sign arbitration agreements. This means that in the event of a dispute, such as allegations of negligence or abuse against the nursing home, the resident waives his or her right to seek a jury trial and instead must allow an arbitrator to hear the case. Nursing homes and other health care providers prefer arbitration because it can limit a victim’s right to discovery–i.e., to seek evidence of abuse or neglect, and the final decision cannot be reviewed in court.

United Health Services of Georgia, Inc. v. Alexander

Judges will enforce nursing home arbitration agreements even when the terms are unfair to residents. But what happens when a family member signs an agreement on behalf of a deceased resident? The Georgia Court of Appeals recently addressed such a case.

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Many Georgia residents take out “umbrella” policies to provide extra insurance protection in the event of an accident. An umbrella policy provides liability coverage above and beyond standard homeowners or automobile insurance. For example, let’s say your auto insurance policy provides $25,000 in coverage for bodily injury. You get into an accident and the other driver sues you for damages. The court awards the driver $100,000, which obviously exceeds your policy limit. At this point, if you have an umbrella policy, which typically provides coverage in the millions of dollars, it would cover the rest of the judgment.

Massey v. Allstate Insurance Company

You can also purchase an umbrella policy for uninsured motorist coverage. This refers to insurance that pays for injuries that you sustain in an accident caused by another driver who either has no insurance or lacks sufficient coverage to pay for your total damages. Georgia law requires all insurers to offer uninsured motorist coverage of at least $25,000 for bodily injury to a single person (or $50,000 for multiple people injured in the same accident). The customer has the option of rejecting UM coverage, but it must be offered.

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In a personal injury case, you cannot recover damages against a defendant based on negligence if you voluntarily assumed the underlying risk. To put it another way, if your own negligence caused the accident, you cannot blame someone else. In some cases, the plaintiff’s responsibility is considered so obvious, a judge will not even let a negligence claim proceed to trial.

Fuller v. McCormick

Here is one such case. The plaintiff worked as a farmhand. During the 13 years of his employment, the plaintiff regularly operated a Bobcat utility vehicle to perform various tasks around the farm.

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A homeowner’s insurance policy offers important protections for both property owners and individuals who may suffer a personal injury on the subject property. But the precise scope of coverage depends on the language of the policy. For example, many homeowner’s policies exclude coverage for injuries suffered by tenants who rent the home from its owner.

State Farm Fire & Casualty Company v. Moss

The Georgia Court of Appeals recently considered the nature of a tenant exclusion in a homeowner’s policy that is the subject of a personal injury lawsuit. The homeowner in this case owned two properties, her primary residence and a lake home. She purchased a homeowner’s policy to cover both properties, listing the lake home as her “secondary residence.”